Best Drupal HostingBest Joomla HostingBest Wordpress Hosting
WORLD POLICY ON AIR

World Policy Journal is proud to share our weekly podcast, World Policy On Air, featuring former Newsweek On Air host David Alpern with timely insights from global affairs analyst Michael Moran of Transformative.io, risk and geostrategy consultants. Click here to subscribe on iTunes!

THE LATEST

AddToAny
Share/Save

2003 Events

Dec 31 2003 12:00 am

 


















2003 Events

Click on the link to view more details and a live or archived video webcast of the event.



























































































































































































































September 23 The 2004 Presidential Race: Will Foreign Policy Matter?
February 20 The Democratic Deficit in Latin America


March 6



America's Intelligence Breakdown

March 13 Frontierland: The Fate of the new Central Asian States
March 19

Documentary Showing of "Nuclear Iceberg"

March 27

Nation Building: Does It Work?



April 3

What's Happened to the Axis of Evil?
April 10 The Troubled World Economy: Is There Any Solution?
April 24 Europe and America: Can the Split Ever be Healed?
September 25 The Bush Doctrine and the 2004 Presidential Race
October 2 Can the United Nations Survive?
October 16 The Schism in the Western Alliance: Can it be Repaired?


October 23



Homeland Security: The Facts Behind the Fiction

November 6 Is the War on Terrorism a War on Scientific Inquiry?
November 13

Religion and U.S. Foreign Policy

November 20

The $500 Billion Question: Can the Pentagon be Contained?



December 4

Terrorism's Aftermath: America's War on Immigrants


 



February 6



THE 2004 PRESIDENTIAL RACE: WILL FOREIGN POLICY MATTER?




a panel discussion with




PROFESSOR MICHAEL KLARE



and
HUMPHREY TAYLOR




Moderated by

STEPHEN SCHLESINGER

Historically, international affairs have not counted for very much in American presidential elections. The economy has proven to be the most important factor to voters. But September 11th, Iraq and homeland security appeared to have played decisive roles in recent Congressional elections. Will a similar batch of global questions be central to the 2004 race? If not, should they be? And which ones would be the most important in assessing a candidate's viability? These and related matters will be the subject of our panel discussion.



February 20

THE DEMOCRATIC DEFICIT IN LATIN AMERICA




a panel discussion with




PETER ROMERO



and
MICHAEL SHIFTER





Moderated by

SILVANA PATERNOSTRO




For the past decade or so, as almost all of Latin America has democratized, the governments of the region have enthusiastically adopted neo-liberal economics. But, given persistent and unresolved financial difficulties throughout the Hemisphere, many citizens are now beginning to doubt the virtues of such an approach. Using the same new democratic impulses, many nations are now veering leftward or in populist directions - in nations like Ecuador, Venezuela and Brazil - but at the cost of widespread social upheaval. Are the needs for economic change compatible with democracy today? Is democracy viable in a Hemisphere with great poverty and illiteracy? What is the future of this vast land-mass, especially given the general neglect or indifference shown to its needs by the United States? What are the prospects for success for Lula in Brazil? Can he construct a workable left-of-center model for the current crop of populist leaders in Latin America? These and other questions will be addressed by the panel.




March 6



AMERICA'S INTELLIGENCE BREAKDOWN




a panel discussion with




MAURICE SONNENBERG



and
RICHARD ALLEN




Moderated by

SHERLE SCHWENNINGER




The multiple failures and shortcomings of US intelligence in the area of counter-terrorism before 9/11 are by now well known. From books to Congressional hearings, the "whys," " wherefores" and "what ifs," have been gone over with a fine toothcomb. But in light of all of this analysis, hand wringing and second-guessing, what concrete steps have actually been taken to fix the problems, and what are likely to be the impact and effectiveness of such measures in combating a new generation of international terrorists, one that seeks to inflict large-scale physical damage and massive casualties on their opponents. And beyond the war on terrorism, what are their civil liberties implications for the people of the United States of new intelligence gathering and analysis capabilities that inevitably involve ever greater intrusions into everyone's' lives?




March 13



FRONTIERLAND:



THE FATE OF THE NEW CENTRAL ASIAN STATES




a panel discussion with




SCOTT HORTON



and
TED KARASIK




Moderated by

IAN BREMMER




Since September 11, the Caspian basin has gotten an extraordinary amount of attention. A confluence of the global energy politics and the war on terror has made "frontierland" a highest policy priority. Cabinet level visits, U.S. bases, and promises of significant funding put the Caspian firmly on the map. Today, the war against Al Qaeda in Afghanistan and Pakistan continues. But with President Bush turning to Iraq and the Middle East, what will come of U.S. policy and Eurasia? Will the United States maintain its present level of involvement? Will Russia reassert an imperial role? Where does China fit in and how stable will the region itself be as a consequence?



March 19

DOCUMENTARY SHOWING OF "NUCLEAR ICEBERG"

The World Policy Institute is hosting a presentation of the documentary film, "Nuclear Iceberg" on Wednesday, March 19th in the Wolff Conference Room. The film depicts the perilous situation as regards "loose nukes" in our contemporary times, especially with respect to the fate of nuclear weaponry in the former Soviet Union. The documentary maker, Tom Selinski, will introduce the film. Two Senior Fellows from the World Policy Institute, who are commentators in the film, William Hartung who directs the Arms Trade Project and Ian Cuthbertson, who is an expert on terrorism, will serve on a panel following the showing to discuss all the implications of "loose nukes".



March 27


NATION BUILDING: DOES IT WORK?

a panel discussion with

JULIE MERTUS
and DAVID L. PHILLIPS

Moderated by BELINDA COOPER


After coming into office firmly opposed to the idea of nation-building, the Bush Administration found itself confronted after September 11 with the need to do just that in Afghanistan and possibly in a future, post-war Iraq. Yet the challenges of nation-building in impoverished, war-torn regions with a history more of fragmentation than of consolidation remain immense. What, indeed, does it mean to build a nation, and how realistic is the prospect? Does nation-building require establishing democratic institutions, even in places that have never known these, or simply ensuring stability, possibly under authoritarian rulers? What roles do outsiders-foreign governments, NGOs, the UN, international financial institutions--play in this process, and how are they to approach the task? Does the experience of rebuilding Germany and Japan after World War II have any relevance? Can the experience of former Yugoslavia provide any guidance? Finally, is the West, above all the current US administration, willing to invest the resources required to build stable nations, or will they instead attempt what some have termed "nation-building lite"?




April 10



THE TROUBLED WORLD ECONOMY:



IS THERE ANY SOLUTION?




a panel discussion with




JEFF MADRICK

and CHRISTIAN WELLER



Moderated by

SHERLE SCHWENNINGER
The world economy is still struggling to overcome the excesses of the 1990s that resulted in the biggest financial bubble in modern world economic history. Today overcapacity in many key industries, an over-leveraged American consumer, deflationary pressures in Europe and Japan, and austerity in much of the developing world--all these factors are restraining normal economic growth. In the face of these conditions, what are the most appropriate strategies for promoting economic growth and prosperity in the near term? And how do these strategies differ from current policies being pursued in Washington?



April 3, 2003



WHAT'S HAPPENED TO THE AXIS OF EVIL?




a panel discussion with




ALAN BRINKLEY

and NICHOLAS LEMANN



Moderated by

ERIC ALTERMAN







President Bush introduced the phrase "axis of evil" in his State of the Union of January 2002. He singled out Iraq, Iran and North Korea as rogue states that America and the world would have to deal with. The consequences of his formulation have since then been startling for our country. The United States is on the precipice of war with Iraq. North Korea, angered at Bush's charge, has chosen to restart its nuclear reactors and manufacture atomic weapons - possibly to sell them to terrorists. Iran has reacted ambiguously, both acquiescing in Washington's crusade against Iraq while denouncing America's empire-building. Are these aftereffects dangerous for the United States? Or are they helpful? What is the long-term impact of Bush's warning? This forum will take the widest possible lens view of the notion of the "Axis of Evil" and its aftermath in the context of the U.S. Presidency, the media, our democracy and our foreign policy.




April 24



EUROPE AND AMERICA:



CAN THE SPLIT EVER BE HEALED?




a panel discussion with




DAVID FROMKIN

and JAMES CHACE







Moderated by

NINA KHRUSHCHEVA







America and four of the major states in Europe, are going through an extremely difficult patch in relations. The war in Iraq has torn asunder the traditional ties between the United States and its historic allies like France, Germany and Belgium, as well as its new found-friendship with Russia. What now are the consequences likely to be for the Atlantic alliance - especially NATO? Can the United Nations Security Council survive this rupture? Does the split portend difficulties for the World Trade Organization? Does globalization face new strains? Is a half-century-long congregation of Western democracies now at an end? Or is it possible that the war in Iraq will be treated as an isolated incident rather than a historic turning point? These issues and related ones will be the subject of the panel discussion.




April 25



On the Brink:



Japan, Korea and the Future of Regional Security in Asia




Escalating tensions between the United States and North Korea, rising anti-American sentiment in South Korea and global turmoil from the American-led war in Iraq have placed new pressures on Japan-Korea relations that could have wide-ranging implications for economic and political stability throughout northeast Asia for decades to come. Uncertainty over policy directions under new South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun, China's economic and military ascendancy, Japan's decade-long economic slump, and questions about America's foreign policy and presence in the region and beyond add further complexity to the picture.




This conference brings together senior foreign policy, security and economic experts, including Christopher J. LaFleur, Special Envoy for Northeast Asia Security Consultations, to discuss the challenges facing Japan, South Korea and the U.S. in this increasingly complex global landscape.




September 25



THE BUSH DOCTRINE AND THE 2004 PRESIDENTIAL RACE




a panel discussion with




SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL

and LEWIS LAPHAM




Moderated by

STEPHEN SCHLESINGER




As the 2004 presidential election nears, the doctrine of preventative war promulgated by President Bush after the terrorist attacks of September 11th has become one of the central issues in dispute among the Democratic candidates for the White House. By endorsing or not endorsing Bush’s 2002 Congressional resolution permitting a preemptive attack on Iraq, the Democratic contenders sought to increase their appeal to primary voters. For its part, the Bush Administration has stuck unflinchingly to its decision in favor of preventive war as a replacement for American reliance on deterrence and containment. What is the likely impact of the Bush doctrine, first, on the Democratic Party race, and, second, on the presidential election. Has the US electorate made up its mind about the legitimacy of preemptive wars? Does the unpopularity of Washington abroad due to Bush policies like these have an impact on American voters? These and other questions will be addressed by the panelists.




October 2



CAN THE UNITED NATIONS SURVIVE?




a panel discussion with




MICHAEL J. GLENNON

AMBASSADOR KISHORE MAHBUBANI

AMBASSADOR PIERRE SCHORI

and EDWARD MORTIMER




Moderated by

MUSTAPHA TLILI




Did the war in Iraq kill off the Security Council? It was already dead, argues Michael J. Glennon in a seminal essay in Foreign Affairs (May/June 2003). According to Glennon, in denying the United States, the super-hegemon of our times, the right to use force, the Council revealed itself to be structurally irrelevant and thus beyond resuscitation in its present form. Does might make right? Can the US go it alone, or would American interests be better served by seeking UN legitimacy for the country's actions? What hopes are there for the international community to come together to stem the threats looming on our common horizon? What future is there for a collective system of peace and security based on sovereign equality of states, as opposed to one purely based on geopolitical realities? These issues and more will be addressed from various angles, including Asian, European, and other diplomatic perspectives.




October 16



THE SCHISM IN THE WESTERN ALLIANCE:



CAN IT BE REPAIRED?




a panel discussion with




MARC ELLENBOGEN

and CHARLES KUPCHAN




Moderated by

MARTIN WALKER




Old Europe's Transatlantic Rifts and New Europe's Transatlantic Futures - - Why are Europe and America drifting apart and could they, and should they get back together? The Iraq war has put intense strain not only on the Atlantic Alliance, but also on the EU itself as it struggles to agree a new Constitution while enlarging from 15 to 25 members. Will the EU be able to overcome its current crisis of confidence after the Swedes decisively rejected the euro, and if so, are we seeing the emergence of a European superpower? And would such a development be good for the United States?




October 23



HOMELAND SECURITY: THE FACTS BEHIND THE FICTION




a panel discussion with




LAWRENCE J. KORB



and
RICHARD K. BETTS




Moderated by

ERIC ALTERMAN




The mantra of the American government since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 has been to protect our country from further radical assaults at all costs. In 2002, President Bush established a cabinet post on Homeland Security devoted to the sole task of defending the nation‘s borders. Almost two years later, we are now just beginning to measure the true effectiveness of this department. This panel will evaluate the usefulness of the administration‘s efforts so far to safeguard American society against outside threats and to ask questions about the direction in which these Bush policies are taking the USA.




November 6



IS THE WAR ON TERRORISM A WAR ON SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY?




a panel discussion with




ADAM BLY



BARRY STEINHARDT




and
VICTOR W. SIDEL, MD.




Moderated by

CLAUDIA DREIFUS




One aspect of the current war on terrorism is the degree to which it is impacting on the culture of American science. Beyond the fact that restrictive immigration rules are making university and laboratory staffings more difficult, the editors of a major professional journal have also agreed to pre-censor articles for sensitive information, science websites are being purged or abridge of data, the President's science advisor has been given the authority to classify information, and Homeland Security has become the hot contender for research dollars, draining funding away from basic research. The panel will review all the questions raised by the post 9/11 changes.




November 13



RELIGION AND U.S. FOREIGN POLICY




a panel discussion with




RANDALL BALMER



and
GRAHAM E. FULLER




Moderated by

MIRA KAMDAR




In response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States launched a war on terror that is often perceived in the Muslim world as a war on Islam. Following the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, and under the shadow of a deteriorating situation between Israel and Palestine, public opinion of the United States in the Muslim world is at an all-time low. The rise of Hindu nationalism in India has reinforced the feeling among many Muslims around the world that they are under seige by Christians, Jews and Hindus, even as terrorist attacks and virulent rhetoric by Islamic radicals have convinced many non-Muslims that Islam is the aggressor. A dangerous "us against them" mentality appears to be on the rise among people of all faiths. At the same time, President G.W. Bush has earned a reputation as being one of the most overtly religious presidents in American history. To what extent does the president's faith and that of other core members of his administration contribute to the formulation of current U.S. foreign policy, and does it do so differently than has been the case historically? To what extent does religion, as a force to be managed or neutralized, now motivate current U.S. conduct of international affairs? Have religious forces made the world a more dangerous place? Can religion help the world find a path toward peace and stability?




November 20



THE $500 BILLION QUESTION:



CAN THE PENTAGON BUDGET BE CONTAINED?




a panel discussion with




CINDY WILLIAMS



and DAVID GOLD




Moderated by

WILLIAM HARTUNG




The Bush administration has increased military spending by more than one-third since it took office in January 2001, with current projections calling for a $500 billion Pentagon budget before the end of this decade. These vast expenditures don‘t even include the $150 billion-plus in emergency spending for the wars in Iraq in Afghanistan, or the roughly $40 billion per year being devoted to homeland defense. Much of this money is being spent for programs that have little or nothing to do with fighting terrorism. This panel will take a critical look at the new military buildup. Are we getting our priorities straight? Does it make sense to finance the new buildup by running up record budget deficits? How does this buildup compare to other post-war military buildups in terms of its impacts on the economy and the federal budget?




December 4



TERRORISM‘S AFTERMATH: AMERICA‘S WAR ON IMMIGRANTS




a panel discussion with




CYRUS MEHTA

and DANIEL TICHENOR




Moderated by

MICHELE WUCKER




Following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the Bush administration has obtained and used new powers to detain immigrants without pressing charges or allowing access to lawyers. It broke up the Immigration and Naturalization Service, whose decrepit bureaucracy had failed to keep out the terrorists who destroyed the World Trade Center. The Justice Department ordered male immigrants from 33 suspect countries to register with authorities and moved to deport 13,000 of the 82,000 men who complied. Have these measures made America a safer place? How willing are we to risk mistaking innocents for terrorists? How do our post-9/11 actions compare with America‘s previous wartime treatment of immigrants? How will they affect our ability to integrate newcomers and enlist their help in the war on terror? With America‘s foreign-born population of 33 million, or 11.8% of the total, how do our post-9/11 policies fit in with a sensible immigration policy agenda?













top



FALL FUNDRAISER

 

Around WPI

Jihad in Sub-Saharan Africa 

This paper, “Jihad in Sub-Saharan Africa: Challenging the Narratives of the War on Terror,” examines the history of Islamic movements in Africa's Sahel region to contextualize current conflicts.

World Economic Roundtable with Vicente Fox 

In this World Economic Roundtable, former Mexican President Vicente Fox discusses his current quest to make his country a hub for technology. 

Intern at World Policy


Want to join our team? Looking for an experience at one of the most highly sought-after internships for ambitious students? Application details here.

 

Al Gore presides over Arctic Roundtable 

As the United States prepares to assume chairmanship of the Arctic Council in 2015, this inaugural convening of the Arctic Deeply Roundtables launches a vital conversation for our times. 

SPONSORED

When the Senate Worked for Us:
New book offers untold stories of how activist staffers countered corporate lobbies in the U.S.


Are the U.S. and China on a collision course?
Get the facts from Amitai Etzioni in “Avoiding War with China.”


MA in International Policy and Development
Middlebury Institute (Monterey, CA): Put theory into practice through client-based coursework. Apply by Nov. 30.

WEEKLY NEWSLETTER

To learn about the latest in media, programming, and fellowship, subscribe to the World Policy Weekly Newsletter and read through our archives.

World Policy on Facebook

FOLLOW US