Best Drupal HostingBest Joomla HostingBest Wordpress Hosting
WORLD POLICY ON AIR

World Policy Journal is proud to share our weekly podcast, World Policy On Air, featuring former Newsweek On Air host David Alpern with timely insights from global affairs analyst Michael Moran of Transformative.io, risk and geostrategy consultants. Click here to subscribe on iTunes!

THE LATEST

AddToAny
Share/Save

2004 World Policy Institute Events

Dec 31 2004 12:00 am




Archive of 2004 lecture series.



Click on the link to view more details and a live or archived video webcast of the event.













































































February 12 WILL FOREIGN POLICY MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE 2004 PRESIDENTIAL RACE?
February 19 ALL IN THE FAMILY CUBAN AMERICANS DEBATE THE CHANGES IN CUBA, THE EXILE COMMUNITY AND NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN US POLICY
March 11 IS TERRORISM FOREVER?
March 25

NUCLEAR DIPLOMACY: IS IT POSSIBLE TO END THE U.S.-NORTH KOREAN CONFRONTATION?

April 8 WAR CRIMES IN WEST AFRICA: WILL THERE BE JUSTICE?
April 15 AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY AND THE WORLD
April 29 RUSSIA’S PRESENT CONDITION: WHY PUTIN COULDN’T LOSE
September 23 THE PRESIDENTIAL RACE: HAS FOREIGN POLICY MADE A DIFFERENCE?
September 27 DOJ/DHS CRTICICAL INCIDENCE CONFERENCE

October 14

CYBERCRIME AND TERRORISM

October 28 IS THE PENTAGON HURTING OUR ECONOMY?
November 04

LOCAL CITIZENS OR GLOBAL CITIZENS: NATIONAL LOYALTIES AT PLAY IN AN AGE OF MASS MIGRATION

November 11

WHY THE MEDIA MISUNDERSTANDS TERRORISM: IMAGING THE ENEMY

November 18

WHEN PRESIDENTS LIE

December 2

INDIA AND THE UNITED STATES: A POST-ELECTION PROGNOSIS
December 6 THE POST-SEPTEMBER 11TH WORLD: CAN THE UNITED NATIONS DELIVER PEACE?
December 7 RUSSIA’S DEMOCRATIC EXPERIMENT: ARMAGEDDON AVERTED
 

February 12 WILL FOREIGN POLICY MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE 2004 PRESIDENTIAL RACE? a panel discussion with


EDWARD LUTTWAK and ROBERT KUTTNER


Moderated by STEPHEN SCHLESINGER


With the presidential election of 2004 now in full motion, the question of whether foreign policy issues will play a role in the outcome of this contest is still an unknown one. Historically the domestic economy has been the deciding factor in most US presidential races. But the Republican Party elevated September 11th and Homeland Security to the top of its political agenda in the 2002 congressional campaign and seized control of the US Senate. It appears to be using the same strategy for the 2004 face-off. Will security issues, indeed, have a similar resonance this time around, especially if there is another terrorist incident? Can the Democrats mount a counterattack arguing the nation is much less secure under President Bush? Will there be any other international issues affecting this race? What issues of a global nature should be raised in this election? These and related questions will be the subject of this panel discussion.


February 19 ALL IN THE FAMILY CUBAN AMERICANS DEBATE THE CHANGES IN CUBA, THE EXILE COMMUNITY AND NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN US POLICY a panel discussion with


CAMILA RUIZ, IGNACIO E. SANCHEZ and ANTONIO R. ZAMORA


Moderated by LISSA WEINMANN


Neither the 45-year Cuban Revolution nor the draconian 44-year US embargo have mellowed with age. Tension between Havana and Washington is reaching new heights. Hardliners close to the White House are pushing for regime change, casting Cuba as the linchpin of what House International Relations Chair Henry Hyde calls the ‘rising axis of evil in the Americas." At the same time, a majority of members of Congress as well as business, human rights and international bodies argue that US national interests and those of the Cuban people would be better served by increasing engagement with the Cuban government now. Nowhere are these approaches as hotly debated as within the Cuban American population. Panelists representing various points of view from within the community will offer a wide-ranging discussion on how Cuba, the Cuban American community and US policy are changing and what these trends imply. We will examine the impact of recent Bush Administration actions toward Cuba, including the abandonment of longstanding bilateral migration accords, cutting US travel to the island (despite various Congressional votes to lift travel restrictions) and the newly created Commission for Assistance to a Free Cuba. We will also explore the community’s role in policy formation, relations with the Cuban dissident community and potential involvement in the future of Cuba.


March 4 A Panel Discussion with JOE CONASON and JAMES CARROLL


Moderated by Stephen Schlesinger, Director, World Policy Institute


As the race for the White House nears its conclusion, the issue that has traditionally dominated America’s quadrennial presidential contest, namely the country’s economic situation, seems to have been sidelined for the first time in many years by foreign policy concerns. American voters appear to be more preoccupied these days about whom is better equipped to defend our nation against future terrorism following the 9/11 attacks; and over whether the Bush Administration should have invaded Iraq, given both our faulty intelligence and our nation’s inability to resolve the ensuing conflicts in that Middle Eastern country. Still the residual economics issues like the so-called “middle class squeeze” and the failure of the US economy to produce new jobs have eaten away at George W. Bush’s legacy. The panelists will address these questions and examine the fundamental themes which underlay the final weeks of this election.  


March 11 IS TERRORISM FOREVER? a panel discussion with


ALLEN GREENSPAN and RICHARD ALLAN


Moderated by IAN CUTHBERTSON


It has been thirty months since 9/11. The Taliban have been deposed and despite numerous bombings in various parts of the world, Al Qaeda has been thwarted, at least for the time being, in its various attempts to launch another attack on American soil. Yet the War on Terrorism continues unabated and the unanswered questions remain: will this war ever be won and can terrorism, in all its facets, be defeated? Or must we accept that this particularly cruel form of political action an inescapable facet of life that is destined always to be with us? To attempt to answer these questions and others we must first understand what drives modern terrorists and what steps can be taken to deal with their fundamental motivations. Will there always be people who want to destroy others to advance their political, social or economic agenda? Is political discourse possible with all or some of them? Or must violence always be met with retaliation? In an age of proliferating weapons of mass destruction, will we ever know true security again? These and other issues that affect all of our lives on a daily basis will be addressed in this panel discussion.


March 25 NUCLEAR DIPLOMACY: IS IT POSSIBLE TO END THE U.S.-NORTH KOREAN CONFRONTATION? a panel discussion with


CHRISTOPHER NELSON and JASON SHAPLEN


Moderated by


JIM NOLT


U.S. policy toward North Korea, which President Bush included in his so-called "Axis of Evil" nations, remains uncertain and often befuddled. North Korea admits to having a nuclear weapons program (apparently assisted by Pakistan), perhaps in an effort to leverage more foreign aid to its moribund economy. But the Bush Administration seems divided between hardliners and pragmatists on what to do in response. Negotiations have proceeded by fits and starts with little apparent progress. Is either side truly interested in a negotiated end to North Korea's nuclear program? What objectives do they seek? Why is progress seemingly so painful and difficult?


April 8 WAR CRIMES IN WEST AFRICA: WILL THERE BE JUSTICE? a panel discussion with


TIAWAN GONGLOE and MARIEKE WIERDA


Moderated by BILL BERKELEY


The civil wars in Liberia and neighboring Sierra Leone killed tens of thousands of civilians, scattered millions from their homes and laid waste to both countries and much of the surrounding region. The fighting has subsided, and the combatants, many of them children, are being disarmed. But a central question remains: will anyone be held accountable for the war crimes that caused so much suffering? A special war crimes tribunal has been established in Sierra Leone under United Nations auspices. The tribunal has indicted Charles Taylor, the former Liberian president and warlord who was centrally responsible for both wars, on charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity. Mr. Taylor abandoned Liberia last summer and now has asylum in Nigeria. Will he be brought to justice? And why does it matter? A leading Liberian human rights lawyer and a noted expert on war crimes tribunals will discuss this landmark case with the author of a critically-acclaimed book on genocide in Africa.


April 15 AMERICAN GRAND STRATEGY AND THE WORLD a panel discussion with


SHERLE SCHWENNINGER and PATRICK SMITH


Moderated by STEPHEN SCHLESINGER


The revolution in American foreign policy that began with the Clinton administration and accelerated with the Bush presidency has run aground in the real world. As a result, the next president, whether Democrat or Republican, will be forced to rethink the most fundamental tenets of American grand strategy, including the emphasis on military dominance, global neo-liberal economics, and the campaign to remake the Middle East. The panelists will explore how the aftermaths of the war in Iraq, on the one hand, and the earlier Asian financial crisis, on the other, have reshaped America’s position in the world and now pose new challenges for American foreign policy.


April 29 RUSSIA’S PRESENT CONDITION: WHY PUTIN COULDN’T LOSE a panel discussion with


GIDEON LICHFIELD, MARIA LIPMAN, ADAM MICHNIK and DAVID REMNICK


Moderated by NINA L. KHRUSHCHEVA


Russia has recently chosen her President for the next four years. The unsurprising results of the March presidential elections—72 % support for Vladimir Putin—have given way to much speculation over the current state of political affairs in Russia. Since first taking office in 2000, Putin has introduced extensive reforms in such areas as pensions, taxation, agriculture, among others. Moreover, he has taken the oligarchs to task. Is Putin’s decisive victory in 2004 a sign that his agenda and promise for a "stable Russia" resonate with the average voter, or is it a result of a state-monopolized media, voting irregularities and the lack of viable opposition? As of 1991, Russia has been undergoing two kinds of transition: from communism to capitalism and from autocracy to democracy. While there is no reason to believe that the first movement will be reversed, the second is far less certain. The enthusiasm for democratic participation palpable in the early 90’s has abated, leaving behind a sense of apathy and disillusionment. The standard defense of Russia’s current semi-autocratic condition is that democracy needs order to develop over time. But what if democracy postponed becomes democracy defeated?


September 23 The Presidential Race: Has Foreign Policy Made a Difference?


JOE CONASON, and JAMES CARROLL


Moderated by Stephen Schlesinger


As the race for the White House nears its conclusion, the issue that has traditionally dominated America’s quadrennial presidential contest, namely the country’s economic situation, seems to have been sidelined for the first time in many years by foreign policy concerns. American voters appear to be more preoccupied these days about whom is better equipped to defend our nation against future terrorism following the 9/11 attacks; and over whether the Bush Administration should have invaded Iraq, given both our faulty intelligence and our nation’s inability to resolve the ensuing conflicts in that Middle Eastern country. Still the residual economics issues like the so-called “middle class squeeze” and the failure of the US economy to produce new jobs have eaten away at George W. Bush’s legacy. The panelists will address these questions and examine the fundamental themes which underlay the final weeks of this election.  


September 27 DOJ/DHS Critical Incident Conference


Hosted by: DHS’s Science & Technology Directorate and DOJ’s National Institute of Justice


This first ever joint DOJ-DHS 3-day conference will allow the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate and the Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice to highlight the technology and training tools currently available and being developed for the responder community to deal with major threats to lives and property, such as terrorist attacks.  The conference offers a unique opportunity for responders, business and industry, academia and elected Federal, State and local stakeholders to network, exchange ideas and address common critical incident technology needs. 


October 14 Cybercrime and Terrorism


BARRY STEINHARDT, EBEN MOGLEN, PAUL ROSENZWEIG and HEATHER MACDONALD


Moderated by KIM TAIPALE, Executive Director, Center for Advanced Studies, and the director of the Global Information Society Project at the World Policy Institute


Security and liberty are not dichotomous rivals to be traded one for the other in a zero sum game; rather, they are dual obligations of a civil society, each to be maximized within the constraints imposed by the other. How can these dual obligations of collective security and individual freedom, including privacy, best be achieved given current developments in information technologies and the threat of international terrorism? The panelists will offer their views on these and related issues. This panel discussion is the first in a series of public discussions to be held as part of the Global Information Society Project’s Program on Law Enforcement and National Security in the Information Age.  


October 28 IS THE PENTAGON HURTING OUR ECONOMY? a panel discussion with


DAVID GOLD and HEATHER MACDONALD


Moderated by WILLIAM HARTUNG  


Since the September 11th attacks, the conventional wisdom has been that the United States should spend whatever it takes to defend itself in an age of global terrorism. But with record deficits, Pentagon spending soaring towards $500 billion per year, and legitimate questions about whether traditional military tools are the most effective instruments for fighting a terror network like Al Qaeda, the time has come to ask whether military resources are being well spent. What are the economic and budgetary tradeoffs involved in the current military buildup? Is there a way to provide more effective security and decrease the Pentagon's burden on the economy?


November 4 LOCAL CITIZENS OR GLOBAL CITIZENS: NATIONAL LOYALTIES AT PLAY IN AN AGE OF MASS MIGRATION a panel discussion with


JORGE PINTO and BRYAN PU-FOLKES


Moderated by MICHELE WUCKER, Senior Fellow and Program on Citizenship & Security Project Leader, The World Policy Institute


In 1849, the historian and diplomat George Bancroft declared that a nation should “as soon tolerate a man with two wives as a man with two countries.” This is no longer so (if, indeed, it ever was). Today, more than 100 countries allow dual citizenship. Ireland and Italy encourage the descendants of émigrés to return to their ancestors’ homeland and become dual citizens. Other countries have created seats in Congress to be filled by representatives of communities abroad. In Croatia’s 1992 elections, 12 of 120 seats in Parliament went to Croatians returning from abroad. Meanwhile, in more than 20 countries, non-citizen residents have the right to vote in local elections; a few countries even allow non-citizens to vote for their national leaders. These new realities raise important questions: What makes a citizen? How are notions of national loyalty changing in an age of global migration? And what does this mean for national unity and national – as well as international – security?  


November 11 WHY THE MEDIA MISUNDERSTANDS TERRORISM: IMAGING THE ENEMY a panel discussion with


MICHAEL MEYER and MIRA KAMDAR


Moderated by MICHELE WUCKER and IAN CUTHBERTSON


In time of war, it is hardly unusual for countries to create and exaggerate a negative image of the enemy. In the United States, such images have traditionally served the critical function of building solidarity and cohesion in a heterogeneous culture. The racist depictions in government propaganda and the media that characterized Germans in the First World War and Japanese in WW II caused a severe backlash against people of these ethnic backgrounds who were also Americans. In today's War on Terrorism, once again, a stereotype has become firmly entrenched in the minds of the vast majority of Americans: that of the fanatical Islamic fundamentalist, a callous and brutal murderer. Polls indicate that large numbers of Americans believe any act of terrorism has `Arab' origins and perpetrators; more broadly, the image has expanded to embrace all Moslems, wearers of turbans, and indeed people with dark skin and foreign accents. Is the American media once again, perhaps unwittingly, repeating these patterns of victimization? Has it been complicit in persuading millions of Americans, using classic methods of suggestion such as shock and repetition, that this nation is surrounded and infiltrated by enemies? Who has been identified as the enemy and what perceptions of them are being propagated in American culture? How has the media contributed to the propagation of the enemy image, and what can and should it do to help correct this false


November 18 WHEN PRESIDENTS LIE a panel discussion with


ERIC ALTERMAN


Lying has become pervasive in American life and, not surprisingly to anyone, in American politics. But what happens when the falsehoods are perpetrated by the very highest levels of the government? Eric Alterman's WHEN PRESIDENTS LIE: A History of Official Deception and its Consequences (Viking) is the first book to tell the story of the start of the Cold War, the Cuban missile crisis and the Vietnam War from the perspective of the lies they spawned and the devastating consequences that resulted. By examining presidential deception through the lens of its pragmatic consequences and employing extensive archival research, Alterman offers a fresh interpretation of historical events. FDR was one of America's World War II heroes, assuring the American people after Yalta that he had secured peace and democracy in Europe. Alterman presents an original explanation for how the Cold War started and shows how the groundwork was laid for McCarthyism and determined the course of the Cold War to come. Almost 20 years later, John F. Kennedy ended the Cuban missile crisis with a covert deal that remained secret for decades. Portraying the crisis to the American people as an unmitigated victory for a president who showed unshakeable resolve has shaped the debate over the effective use of American power in the decades since. Two years later, Lyndon Johnson's misrepresentation of the second "Gulf of Tonkin" incident set the United States on a tragic course in Vietnam; Alterman offers a unique explanation for why Johnson felt a need to fight there. And finally, Alterman examines how Ronald Reagan's Central American wars ended in the ignominy of the Iran-Contra scandal and helped set the stage for George W. Bush's "post-truth" presidency.


December 2 INDIA AND THE UNITED STATES: A POST-ELECTION PROGNOSIS a panel discussion with


BROOKS ENTWISTLE and SUMIT GANGULY


Moderated by MIRA KAMDAR


Relations between the United States and India have improved dramatically since the estranged period of the Cold War and the Nonaligned Movement. Yet, despite wide commonalities of values and interests, there remain important divisions that cast the shadow of a lingering fragility on the relationship. Elections in India earlier this year brought a new government to power that has shifted the Indian definition of the relationship from"natural allies" to "strategic partners." India has not been pleased with the United States' conferring non-NATO status on neighboring Pakistan, for example. On the U.S. side, the outsourcing of jobs to India became a major issue in the 2004 election. Indeed, business ties are expanding rapidly, with important implications for investment flows, public and private equity markets and corporate strategic activity between the two countries. India is widely believed to become, with China, one of the most powerful economic engines and geopolitical players in the world within the next 50 years. The United States, meanwhile, remains the undisputed global superpower. A powerful force in the relationship is the Indian-American community, at 2 million one of the fastest growing immigrant groups in the United States. Indian-Americans are playing an unprecedented role in U.S. domestic politics and are working hard to influence U.S. foreign policy as well. In the wake of elections in India earlier this year and the recent elections in the United States, what is the prognosis for the relationship between two of the world's most important democracies?


December 6 THE POST-SEPTEMBER 11TH WORLD: CAN THE UNITED NATIONS DELIVER PEACE?


a panel discussion with


YVES DOUTRIAUX and EDWARD MORTIMER


Moderated by MUSTAPHA TLILI


The objective of the panel discussion is to examine the implications of the tragic events of September 11th for the United Nations. In the aftermath of the Cold War, there were high expectations for a revitalized and expanded United Nations role in resolving many of the conflicts arising from the break-up of the old bi-polar order. Ten years later, an atmosphere of pessimism regarding the effectiveness of the Organization was widespread in many quarters in the United States. Although this was, in large part, due to the lack of resources and clear mandates given to the UN to fulfill the new hopes, it was nonetheless the atmosphere that pervaded during the Bush Administration’s ascension to power. September 11th, however, seems to have changed all this. Once again there are high and glorified expectations for the UN, for example, as a nation-builder in post-conflict Afghanistan. Additionally, the Organization was recently spotlighted as recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. But is the UN being set up for a new and potentially more dangerous disappointment? Are the recent Security Council resolutions to fight terrorism redefining the commitments of the Organization at the expense of other concerns? Will the UN have adequate resources to effectively address all its priorities? These are some of the questions that will be addressed in the panel discussion.


December 7 RUSSIA’S DEMOCRATIC EXPERIMENT: ARMAGEDDON AVERTED


A Presentation by


STEPHEN KOTKIN With a commentary bySTEPHEN HOLMES


Moderated by NINA KHRUSHCHEVA Senior Fellow, World Policy Institute


In 1991, the world looked in amazement at the collapse of the Soviet Union. But as Stephen Kotkin suggests, this downfall was neither sudden nor unexpected but rather inevitable. In his new book, Armageddon Averted: The Soviet Collapse 1970-2000 (Oxford University Press, 2001), Kotkin illuminates the factors that led to the downfall of Communism and the USSR, following the global economic changes from the 1970s to the present day as his guide. Explaining the "stable mess" in post-Soviet Russia, Kotkin makes a compelling distinction between liberalism and democracy. He argues that even democratically elected leaders often behave like dictators unless they are constrained by the liberal order, the rule of law. Yeltsin’s Russia was all too eager to become a capitalistic democracy, which ignited the prompt removable of all institutional constraints beginning in 1991. But "liberalism," Kotkin reminds us, "entails not freedom from government but constant, rigorous officiating of the private sphere…[it] means not just representative government but effective government, a geopolitical imperative for prosperity in the hierarchical world economy." Stephen Holmes, also well-known for the argument that freedom requires rules, believes that liberalism’s basic principles provide a foundation for the development of democratic and regulatory politics. Using these concepts, he will address the institutional implications of the Soviet collapse and the prospects for liberalism for Russia’s future.


 


top

FALL FUNDRAISER

 

Around WPI

Jihad in Sub-Saharan Africa 

This paper, “Jihad in Sub-Saharan Africa: Challenging the Narratives of the War on Terror,” examines the history of Islamic movements in Africa's Sahel region to contextualize current conflicts.

World Economic Roundtable with Vicente Fox 

In this World Economic Roundtable, former Mexican President Vicente Fox discusses his current quest to make his country a hub for technology. 

Intern at World Policy


Want to join our team? Looking for an experience at one of the most highly sought-after internships for ambitious students? Application details here.

 

Al Gore presides over Arctic Roundtable 

As the United States prepares to assume chairmanship of the Arctic Council in 2015, this inaugural convening of the Arctic Deeply Roundtables launches a vital conversation for our times. 

SPONSORED

When the Senate Worked for Us:
New book offers untold stories of how activist staffers countered corporate lobbies in the U.S.


Are the U.S. and China on a collision course?
Get the facts from Amitai Etzioni in “Avoiding War with China.”


MA in International Policy and Development
Middlebury Institute (Monterey, CA): Put theory into practice through client-based coursework. Apply by Nov. 30.

WEEKLY NEWSLETTER

To learn about the latest in media, programming, and fellowship, subscribe to the World Policy Weekly Newsletter and read through our archives.

World Policy on Facebook

FOLLOW US