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the real peace


"one must admit that Israel has taken some steps since the Oslo Accords toward acknowledging the Palestinian suffering": thus guy lives on the moon. He should spend few days in the Pal Territory. The problem is that most of the Israelis simply don't know the reality about which they write about. "the Jewish narrative, and the fact that Jewish roots in Palestine date back thousands of years long before the Arab invasion": first, religion is something private between you and your god; you cannot use it in a political way. Second, the "arab invasion" is one of the many myths that you used in this post. Let me quote Maxime Rodinson: “A foreign people had come and imposed itself on a native population. The Arab population of Palestine were native in all the usual senses of that word. Ignorance, sometimes backed up by hypocritical propaganda, has spread a number of misconceptions on this subject, unfortunately very widely held. It has been said that since the Arabs took the country by military conquest in the seventh century, they are occupiers like any other, like the Romans, the Crusaders and the Turks. Why therefore should they be regarded as any more native than the others, and in particular than the Jews, who were native to that country in ancient times, or at least occupiers of longer standing? To the historian the answer is obvious. A small contingent of Arabs from Arabia did indeed conquer the country in the seventh century. But as a result of factors which were briefly outlined in the first chapter of this book, the Palestinian population soon became Arabized under Arab domination, just as earlier it had been Hebraicized, Aramaicized, to some degree even Hellenized. It became Arab in a way that it was never to become Latinized or Ottomanized. The invaded melted with the invaders. It is ridiculous to call the English of today invaders and occupiers, on the grounds that England was conquered from Celtic peoples by the Angles, Saxons and Jutes in the fifth and sixth centuries. The population was “Anglicized” and nobody suggests that the peoples which have more or less preserved the Celtic tongues – the Irish, the Welsh or the Bretons – should be regarded as the true natives of Kent or Suffolk, with greater titles to these territories than the English who live in those counties.” Pals were 100 years ago the 9/10th of the people on the spot. Until the day in which the majority of the Israelis will not acknowledge which price they paid in order to make their/your dream true, we will not have any peace.
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