Best Drupal HostingBest Joomla HostingBest Wordpress Hosting
WORLD POLICY ON AIR

World Policy Journal is proud to share our weekly podcast, World Policy On Air, featuring former Newsweek On Air host David Alpern with timely insights from global affairs analyst Michael Moran of Transformative.io, risk and geostrategy consultants. Click here to subscribe on iTunes!

THE LATEST

AddToAny
Share/Save

World Policy Institute - Research Projects - November 5, 2004

ARMS TRADE RESOURCE CENTER CURRENT UPDATES: October 27, 2004 Dear Friends, We have cried (or come close). We have shaken our heads in disappointment. We have sat stunned and silent. We have visualized worst case scenarios ad infinitum. What lies ahead? What do we do now? We read and listened and thought and here is some of what we came up with. Peace and Hope from all of us at the Arms Trade Resource Center, Frida Berrigan Michelle Ciarrocca William Hartung In this update: I. Election Analysis and Lessons II. Electoral Malfunctions III. The Most Expensive Campaign In History, or What Money Can Buy IV. Democracy On The March V. National IQ's and the Election I. Post-Election Analysis and Lessons Official post-election assessments by our friends in the progressive community have alternated between those that see the glass: 1. Half Full -- lots of engagement by new people and organizations, increased turnout on the Democratic side, all providing positive energy to build on for the future 2. Half Empty -- a need to radically revise the Democratic message on national security, basic values, and other bedrock issues while building a new infrastructure from the grassroots on up to the level of think tanks/intellectual capital/media outreach. And privately, many of our friends and colleagues have a third, more apocalyptic view: they see the glass as teetering on the edge of the table, about to fall and shatter into a thousand pieces. Regardless of which view you take (and the next few weeks may not be the time to come to any final judgments!), one thing is for certain, we need all hands on deck to deal with the implications of a second Bush term. Now is the time to screw on our courage and get back out there. Keep doing what we were doing and do more of it. Do it smarter and do it more strategically. Build blue political power, and move the Democrats to the left. Refute the claims of compassion and conservation of the "compassionate conservatives." In his address on November 4th President Bush said, "I earned capital in this election and I am going to spend it." It sent chills down our spines. What does that mean? A mandate to bomb Fallujah, to bring more troops into Iraq, to apply the "Iraq" model to proliferation in Iran and North Korea, to roll civil rights back even further in the U.S.? And worse? On foreign policy, some of the more extreme elements of the neo-conservative agenda may be reined in by the reality of the fiasco they have created in Iraq, which is draining blood and treasure at an accelerating rate with no clear end in sight (barring a radical reconsideration of the goals of U.S. policy). This may provide some leverage to press for good faith negotiations in North Korea and Iran, although much may depend on who is appointed Secretary of State, and whether neo-cons are eased out of key mid-level positions at the Pentagon and in the White House in favor of more pragmatic advisors. Star Wars and a new generation of low-yield and bunker busting nuclear weapons will still be on the administration's agenda, and the challenge will be to educate a broader segment of the public (and at least some Congressional Republicans) about the risks and costs of proceeding with these ill-conceived programs. Efforts to block the worst features of the Bush foreign policy agenda while pressing for positive movement on a few key issues will be greatly enhanced if there is movement on broader political reform happening in parallel to these efforts. In his TalkingPointsMemo.com, Joshua Micah Marshall reminds us that while Bush claims that his win represents a broad affirmation of his policies and gives him a mandate, in reality 51% of the popular vote is a skin of the teeth win. It is the narrowest victory by an incumbent president since Woodrow Wilson's re-election in 1916. He says: "This isn't 1964 or 1972 or 1980. This wasn't a blowout or a repudiation. It was close to a tie -- unfortunately, on the other guy's side. Let's not put our heads in the sand but let's also not get knocked off our game. Democrats need to think critically and seriously about why this didn't turn out 51% for Kerry or 55% for Kerry (and we'll get to those points in the future). "Take time to feel the desolation and disappointment. But I remain confident that time is not on the side of the kind of values and politics that President Bush represents. It took conservatives two decades to build up the institutional muscle they have today*. President Bush and the Republicans now control the entire national government, even more surely now than they have over the last four years. They do so on the basis of garnering the votes of 51% or 52% of the population. But they will use that power as though there were no opposition at all. That needs to be countered." Marshall recalls a conversation with Simon Rosenberg, the head of New Democrat Network, whose mission is to modernize progressive politics, build a new and durable Democratic majority, and advocate for an agenda that will create a better future for our children. Rosenberg is taking a long view, acknowledging that the Democrats are far behind the Republicans in institution building that supports political thought, strategy and action. NDN seeks to fill that gap. Marshall notes that there is a need for institutions and organizational infrastructure that can sustain energy and power when people's interest cools or dissipates - especially after a disappointment like Kerry's loss. "What Democrats have begun to build over the last two years is tremendously important. It just wasn't enough, not yet." Simon Rosenberg says that efforts to create a Democratic-leaning counter-establishment along the lines of what Republicans did two generations ago -- with an alternative media, activist groups, organized political giving, in short, a political infrastructure -- will take ten years to build. Marshall encourages us to keep doing that work, saying, "Leave today for disappointment. Tomorrow, think over which of these various groups and organizations you think has made the best start toward what I've described above, go to their website, and give money or volunteer*. You shouldn't lose heart. The same division in the country remains, the same stalemate. The other side just got the ball a yard or two into our side of the field rather than the reverse. And we have to deal with the serious consequences of that. Tomorrow's the day to start." Read his whole message on his site: www.talkingpointsmemo.com Matt Bai wrote a long article for the New York Times magazine in July 2004 called "Wiring the Vast Left Wing Conspiracy" about who is doing that work and how.... It is worth a read. II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS? II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS? If you have doubts about the conduct of this election, there is plenty of evidence to confirm your suspicions: -- The most credible that we have encountered comes from Greg Palast, a tireless investigative reporter, who knows the issue inside and out. His latest take on the election can be found on TomPaine.com. Palast notes, Bush won Ohio by 136,483 votes. In the US, about 3% of votes case are voided -- known as "spoilage" in election jargon -- because the ballots cast are inconclusive. Drawing on what happened in Florida and studies of elections past, Greg Palast argues that if Ohio's discarded ballots were counted, Kerry would have won the state. Today, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports there are a total of 247,672 votes not counted in Ohio, if you add the 92,672 discarded votes plus the 155,000 provisional ballots. Read his article "Kerry Won...", and "An Election Spoiled Rotten" -- Buried in the technology section on CNN.com is an AP article "E-vote goes smoothly, but experts skeptical: No paper trail means software glitches, tampering may go unnoticed," -- "According to e-voting haters and some bloggers, the fact that the election went smoothly is no comfort-- the whole problem with electronic voting is that someone could swoop in and changed the votes without anyone having a clue," For a full run down of recent articles on e-voting go to "Rage Against the Machines: The Web wonders if electronic voting machines stole the election," by Josh Levin -- Walden W. O'Dell, chief executive of Diebold Inc., the country's biggest supplier of paperless, touch-screen voting machines -- used in Ohio, Florida, New Mexico and others -- wrote a letter inviting friends to a Republican Party fundraiser, in the letter he wrote, "I am committed to helping Ohio deliver its electoral votes to the president next year." O'Dell's company is based in Ohio, while subsidiary Diebold Election Systems is located in McKinney, Texas. At least 8 million people cast their ballots using Diebold machines, hmmmm, maybe a slight conflict of interest? www.nytimes.com -- A November 3rd Reuters article reported, "Voters across the US reported problems with the electronic touch-screen systems on Tuesday in what critics said could be a sign that the machines used by one-third of the population were prone to error." The article goes on to note that voters calling into an election-day hotline reported more than 1,100 problems with the machines -- from improperly tallied choices to frozen screens to candidates not even listed on the ballots. Read the article at www.commondreams.org Additional Resources: 1. Institute for Public Accuracy, Was the Ohio Election Honest and Fair? 2. For a comprehensive, non-partisan background on the perils and benefits of e-voting, check out WIRED News E-voting gains a foothold at polling places in the U.S. and abroad, despite fears that the technology is flawed and votes easily manipulated. Is the voting booth still sacred? Does your vote still count? 3. For background articles on voting machines take a look at "Voting Machine Controversy," by Julie Carr Smyth, and "Diebold's Political Machine," by Bob Fitrakis and Harvey Wasserman, which appeared in Mother Jones 4. **EXIT POLL PROBLEMS LED TO SKEWED DATA The new $10 million polling system used by many news organizations was marred by problems that led to an early impression that John Kerry was winning. WSJ: "To the extent that blogs provide people with bad or misleading information, I hope that teaches people not to trust media in general," says Wonkette editor Ana Marie Cox. Mediachannel: Moral values' factor skewed by faulty exit polling, writes Andrew Tyndall. III. NO WIN ON THE CHEAP The Center for Responsive Politics calls this election the most expensive in American history, with candidates spending more than $4 billion. Their recent press release "Money Wins Big" finds that the biggest spender was victorious in 413 of 433 decided House races (96%) and 29 of 33 decided Senate races (91%). This is an even greater proportion than on Election Day 2002,when the top spenders won 95 percent of House races and 76 percent of Senate races. "In the race for the White House, President Bush spent a total of $306.3 million in private and government funds from January 2003. Sen. John Kerry, who faced a tough battle for the Democratic nomination, spent $241.7 million. These figures do not include spending by the political parties or advocacy groups on the presidential election. For all the details, visit www.OpenSecrets.org IV. DEMOCRACY ON THE MARCH? About 120 million Americans voted on Tuesday- pressing touch-screens, pulling levers, and filling out paper ballots with pens. All in all, about 60% of eligible voters made their choices, making this the most complete election since 1968. Much has been made of the turn out and the long lines at polling places. Miles Rapoport, President of Demos: A Network for Ideas & Action, a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy organization, says this is hugely important but indicative of a problem that most mainstream media misses. "This strong voter turnout occurred in many ways in spite of our elections system, not because of it*. "In applauding long voting lines as a triumph of democracy, commentators overlook a fundamental question: why can't we get our election systems right? We expected a record turnout and a surge of new voters, yet many still had to wait hours to cast their votes. In short, Rapoport notes, "our electoral process suffered systemic and entirely preventable failures, including: -- Polling places opening late -- Absentee ballots not being received by voters -- Shortages of provisional ballots -- Poll workers asking for ID that was not required -- Registered voters names not appearing on voter registration rolls -- Voting machine failures -- Confusion over polling site changes -- Understaffed polling stations, leading to long lines "Most of the problems that arose during yesterday's election were preventable, and highlight the need for substantial reform before our next Presidential election." For information about Demos, and their program on voters' rights, visit their homepage at www.demos-usa.org V. NATIONAL IQ'S AND THE ELECTION And... in addition to our cries, we still need to laugh, check out these sobering statistics: National IQ's and the Election Reports   |  Recent News Coverage   |  Updates ARMS TRADE RESOURCE CENTER CURRENT UPDATES: October 27, 2004 Dear Friends, We have cried (or come close). We have shaken our heads in disappointment. We have sat stunned and silent. We have visualized worst case scenarios ad infinitum. What lies ahead? What do we do now? We read and listened and thought and here is some of what we came up with. Peace and Hope from all of us at the Arms Trade Resource Center, Frida Berrigan Michelle Ciarrocca William Hartung In this update: I. Election Analysis and Lessons II. Electoral Malfunctions III. The Most Expensive Campaign In History, or What Money Can Buy IV. Democracy On The March V. National IQ's and the Election I. Post-Election Analysis and Lessons Official post-election assessments by our friends in the progressive community have alternated between those that see the glass: 1. Half Full -- lots of engagement by new people and organizations, increased turnout on the Democratic side, all providing positive energy to build on for the future 2. Half Empty -- a need to radically revise the Democratic message on national security, basic values, and other bedrock issues while building a new infrastructure from the grassroots on up to the level of think tanks/intellectual capital/media outreach. And privately, many of our friends and colleagues have a third, more apocalyptic view: they see the glass as teetering on the edge of the table, about to fall and shatter into a thousand pieces. Regardless of which view you take (and the next few weeks may not be the time to come to any final judgments!), one thing is for certain, we need all hands on deck to deal with the implications of a second Bush term. Now is the time to screw on our courage and get back out there. Keep doing what we were doing and do more of it. Do it smarter and do it more strategically. Build blue political power, and move the Democrats to the left. Refute the claims of compassion and conservation of the "compassionate conservatives." In his address on November 4th President Bush said, "I earned capital in this election and I am going to spend it." It sent chills down our spines. What does that mean? A mandate to bomb Fallujah, to bring more troops into Iraq, to apply the "Iraq" model to proliferation in Iran and North Korea, to roll civil rights back even further in the U.S.? And worse? On foreign policy, some of the more extreme elements of the neo-conservative agenda may be reined in by the reality of the fiasco they have created in Iraq, which is draining blood and treasure at an accelerating rate with no clear end in sight (barring a radical reconsideration of the goals of U.S. policy). This may provide some leverage to press for good faith negotiations in North Korea and Iran, although much may depend on who is appointed Secretary of State, and whether neo-cons are eased out of key mid-level positions at the Pentagon and in the White House in favor of more pragmatic advisors. Star Wars and a new generation of low-yield and bunker busting nuclear weapons will still be on the administration's agenda, and the challenge will be to educate a broader segment of the public (and at least some Congressional Republicans) about the risks and costs of proceeding with these ill-conceived programs. Efforts to block the worst features of the Bush foreign policy agenda while pressing for positive movement on a few key issues will be greatly enhanced if there is movement on broader political reform happening in parallel to these efforts. In his TalkingPointsMemo.com, Joshua Micah Marshall reminds us that while Bush claims that his win represents a broad affirmation of his policies and gives him a mandate, in reality 51% of the popular vote is a skin of the teeth win. It is the narrowest victory by an incumbent president since Woodrow Wilson's re-election in 1916. He says: "This isn't 1964 or 1972 or 1980. This wasn't a blowout or a repudiation. It was close to a tie -- unfortunately, on the other guy's side. Let's not put our heads in the sand but let's also not get knocked off our game. Democrats need to think critically and seriously about why this didn't turn out 51% for Kerry or 55% for Kerry (and we'll get to those points in the future). "Take time to feel the desolation and disappointment. But I remain confident that time is not on the side of the kind of values and politics that President Bush represents. It took conservatives two decades to build up the institutional muscle they have today*. President Bush and the Republicans now control the entire national government, even more surely now than they have over the last four years. They do so on the basis of garnering the votes of 51% or 52% of the population. But they will use that power as though there were no opposition at all. That needs to be countered." Marshall recalls a conversation with Simon Rosenberg, the head of New Democrat Network, whose mission is to modernize progressive politics, build a new and durable Democratic majority, and advocate for an agenda that will create a better future for our children. Rosenberg is taking a long view, acknowledging that the Democrats are far behind the Republicans in institution building that supports political thought, strategy and action. NDN seeks to fill that gap. Marshall notes that there is a need for institutions and organizational infrastructure that can sustain energy and power when people's interest cools or dissipates - especially after a disappointment like Kerry's loss. "What Democrats have begun to build over the last two years is tremendously important. It just wasn't enough, not yet." Simon Rosenberg says that efforts to create a Democratic-leaning counter-establishment along the lines of what Republicans did two generations ago -- with an alternative media, activist groups, organized political giving, in short, a political infrastructure -- will take ten years to build. Marshall encourages us to keep doing that work, saying, "Leave today for disappointment. Tomorrow, think over which of these various groups and organizations you think has made the best start toward what I've described above, go to their website, and give money or volunteer*. You shouldn't lose heart. The same division in the country remains, the same stalemate. The other side just got the ball a yard or two into our side of the field rather than the reverse. And we have to deal with the serious consequences of that. Tomorrow's the day to start." Read his whole message on his site: www.talkingpointsmemo.com Matt Bai wrote a long article for the New York Times magazine in July 2004 called "Wiring the Vast Left Wing Conspiracy" about who is doing that work and how.... It is worth a read. II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS? II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS? If you have doubts about the conduct of this election, there is plenty of evidence to confirm your suspicions: -- The most credible that we have encountered comes from Greg Palast, a tireless investigative reporter, who knows the issue inside and out. His latest take on the election can be found on TomPaine.com. Palast notes, Bush won Ohio by 136,483 votes. In the US, about 3% of votes case are voided -- known as "spoilage" in election jargon -- because the ballots cast are inconclusive. Drawing on what happened in Florida and studies of elections past, Greg Palast argues that if Ohio's discarded ballots were counted, Kerry would have won the state. Today, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports there are a total of 247,672 votes not counted in Ohio, if you add the 92,672 discarded votes plus the 155,000 provisional ballots. Read his article "Kerry Won...", and "An Election Spoiled Rotten" -- Buried in the technology section on CNN.com is an AP article "E-vote goes smoothly, but experts skeptical: No paper trail means software glitches, tampering may go unnoticed," -- "According to e-voting haters and some bloggers, the fact that the election went smoothly is no comfort-- the whole problem with electronic voting is that someone could swoop in and changed the votes without anyone having a clue," For a full run down of recent articles on e-voting go to "Rage Against the Machines: The Web wonders if electronic voting machines stole the election," by Josh Levin -- Walden W. O'Dell, chief executive of Diebold Inc., the country's biggest supplier of paperless, touch-screen voting machines -- used in Ohio, Florida, New Mexico and others -- wrote a letter inviting friends to a Republican Party fundraiser, in the letter he wrote, "I am committed to helping Ohio deliver its electoral votes to the president next year." O'Dell's company is based in Ohio, while subsidiary Diebold Election Systems is located in McKinney, Texas. At least 8 million people cast their ballots using Diebold machines, hmmmm, maybe a slight conflict of interest? www.nytimes.com -- A November 3rd Reuters article reported, "Voters across the US reported problems with the electronic touch-screen systems on Tuesday in what critics said could be a sign that the machines used by one-third of the population were prone to error." The article goes on to note that voters calling into an election-day hotline reported more than 1,100 problems with the machines -- from improperly tallied choices to frozen screens to candidates not even listed on the ballots. Read the article at www.commondreams.org Additional Resources: 1. Institute for Public Accuracy, Was the Ohio Election Honest and Fair? 2. For a comprehensive, non-partisan background on the perils and benefits of e-voting, check out WIRED News E-voting gains a foothold at polling places in the U.S. and abroad, despite fears that the technology is flawed and votes easily manipulated. Is the voting booth still sacred? Does your vote still count? 3. For background articles on voting machines take a look at "Voting Machine Controversy," by Julie Carr Smyth, and "Diebold's Political Machine," by Bob Fitrakis and Harvey Wasserman, which appeared in Mother Jones 4. **EXIT POLL PROBLEMS LED TO SKEWED DATA The new $10 million polling system used by many news organizations was marred by problems that led to an early impression that John Kerry was winning. WSJ: "To the extent that blogs provide people with bad or misleading information, I hope that teaches people not to trust media in general," says Wonkette editor Ana Marie Cox. Mediachannel: Moral values' factor skewed by faulty exit polling, writes Andrew Tyndall. III. NO WIN ON THE CHEAP The Center for Responsive Politics calls this election the most expensive in American history, with candidates spending more than $4 billion. Their recent press release "Money Wins Big" finds that the biggest spender was victorious in 413 of 433 decided House races (96%) and 29 of 33 decided Senate races (91%). This is an even greater proportion than on Election Day 2002,when the top spenders won 95 percent of House races and 76 percent of Senate races. "In the race for the White House, President Bush spent a total of $306.3 million in private and government funds from January 2003. Sen. John Kerry, who faced a tough battle for the Democratic nomination, spent $241.7 million. These figures do not include spending by the political parties or advocacy groups on the presidential election. For all the details, visit www.OpenSecrets.org IV. DEMOCRACY ON THE MARCH? About 120 million Americans voted on Tuesday- pressing touch-screens, pulling levers, and filling out paper ballots with pens. All in all, about 60% of eligible voters made their choices, making this the most complete election since 1968. Much has been made of the turn out and the long lines at polling places. Miles Rapoport, President of Demos: A Network for Ideas & Action, a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy organization, says this is hugely important but indicative of a problem that most mainstream media misses. "This strong voter turnout occurred in many ways in spite of our elections system, not because of it*. "In applauding long voting lines as a triumph of democracy, commentators overlook a fundamental question: why can't we get our election systems right? We expected a record turnout and a surge of new voters, yet many still had to wait hours to cast their votes. In short, Rapoport notes, "our electoral process suffered systemic and entirely preventable failures, including: -- Polling places opening late -- Absentee ballots not being received by voters -- Shortages of provisional ballots -- Poll workers asking for ID that was not required -- Registered voters names not appearing on voter registration rolls -- Voting machine failures -- Confusion over polling site changes -- Understaffed polling stations, leading to long lines "Most of the problems that arose during yesterday's election were preventable, and highlight the need for substantial reform before our next Presidential election." For information about Demos, and their program on voters' rights, visit their homepage at www.demos-usa.org V. NATIONAL IQ'S AND THE ELECTION And... in addition to our cries, we still need to laugh, check out these sobering statistics: National IQ's and the Election Reports   |  Recent News Coverage   |  Updates
ARMS TRADE RESOURCE CENTERARMS TRADE RESOURCE CENTERARMS TRADE RESOURCE CENTERARMS TRADE RESOURCE CENTER

CURRENT UPDATES: October 27, 2004CURRENT UPDATES: October 27, 2004CURRENT UPDATES: October 27, 2004

CURRENT UPDATES: October 27, 2004

Dear Friends,Dear Friends,

Dear Friends,

We have cried (or come close). We have shaken our heads in disappointment. We have sat stunned and silent. We have visualized worst case scenarios ad infinitum.We have cried (or come close). We have shaken our heads in disappointment. We have sat stunned and silent. We have visualized worst case scenarios ad infinitum.

We have cried (or come close). We have shaken our heads in disappointment. We have sat stunned and silent. We have visualized worst case scenarios ad infinitum.

What lies ahead?What lies ahead?

What lies ahead?

What do we do now?What do we do now?

What do we do now?

We read and listened and thought and here is some of what we came up with.We read and listened and thought and here is some of what we came up with.

We read and listened and thought and here is some of what we came up with.

Peace and Hope from all of us at the Arms Trade Resource Center,
Frida Berrigan
Michelle Ciarrocca
William Hartung
Peace and Hope from all of us at the Arms Trade Resource Center, Frida Berrigan Michelle Ciarrocca William Hartung

Peace and Hope from all of us at the Arms Trade Resource Center, Frida Berrigan Michelle Ciarrocca William Hartung

In this update:In this update:
I. Election Analysis and LessonsI. Election Analysis and Lessons
II. Electoral MalfunctionsII. Electoral Malfunctions
III. The Most Expensive Campaign In History, or What Money Can BuyIII. The Most Expensive Campaign In History, or What Money Can Buy
IV. Democracy On The MarchIV. Democracy On The March
V. National IQ's and the ElectionV. National IQ's and the Election
In this update: I. Election Analysis and Lessons II. Electoral Malfunctions III. The Most Expensive Campaign In History, or What Money Can Buy IV. Democracy On The March V. National IQ's and the Election

In this update: I. Election Analysis and Lessons II. Electoral Malfunctions III. The Most Expensive Campaign In History, or What Money Can Buy IV. Democracy On The March V. National IQ's and the Election

I. Post-Election Analysis and LessonsI. Post-Election Analysis and LessonsI. Post-Election Analysis and Lessons
I. Post-Election Analysis and Lessons
I. Post-Election Analysis and Lessons

Official post-election assessments by our friends in the progressive community have alternated between those that see the glass:
1. Half Full -- lots of engagement by new people and organizations, increased turnout on the Democratic side, all providing positive energy to build on for the future
2. Half Empty -- a need to radically revise the Democratic message on national security, basic values, and other bedrock issues while building a new infrastructure from the grassroots on up to the level of think tanks/intellectual capital/media outreach.
And privately, many of our friends and colleagues have a third, more apocalyptic view: they see the glass as teetering on the edge of the table, about to fall and shatter into a thousand pieces. Regardless of which view you take (and the next few weeks may not be the time to come to any final judgments!), one thing is for certain, we need all hands on deck to deal with the implications of a second Bush term.
Official post-election assessments by our friends in the progressive community have alternated between those that see the glass: 1. Half Full -- lots of engagement by new people and organizations, increased turnout on the Democratic side, all providing positive energy to build on for the future 2. Half Empty -- a need to radically revise the Democratic message on national security, basic values, and other bedrock issues while building a new infrastructure from the grassroots on up to the level of think tanks/intellectual capital/media outreach. And privately, many of our friends and colleagues have a third, more apocalyptic view: they see the glass as teetering on the edge of the table, about to fall and shatter into a thousand pieces. Regardless of which view you take (and the next few weeks may not be the time to come to any final judgments!), one thing is for certain, we need all hands on deck to deal with the implications of a second Bush term.

Official post-election assessments by our friends in the progressive community have alternated between those that see the glass: 1. Half Full -- lots of engagement by new people and organizations, increased turnout on the Democratic side, all providing positive energy to build on for the future 2. Half Empty -- a need to radically revise the Democratic message on national security, basic values, and other bedrock issues while building a new infrastructure from the grassroots on up to the level of think tanks/intellectual capital/media outreach. And privately, many of our friends and colleagues have a third, more apocalyptic view: they see the glass as teetering on the edge of the table, about to fall and shatter into a thousand pieces. Regardless of which view you take (and the next few weeks may not be the time to come to any final judgments!), one thing is for certain, we need all hands on deck to deal with the implications of a second Bush term.

Now is the time to screw on our courage and get back out there. Keep doing what we were doing and do more of it. Do it smarter and do it more strategically. Build blue political power, and move the Democrats to the left. Refute the claims of compassion and conservation of the "compassionate conservatives."Now is the time to screw on our courage and get back out there. Keep doing what we were doing and do more of it. Do it smarter and do it more strategically. Build blue political power, and move the Democrats to the left. Refute the claims of compassion and conservation of the "compassionate conservatives."

Now is the time to screw on our courage and get back out there. Keep doing what we were doing and do more of it. Do it smarter and do it more strategically. Build blue political power, and move the Democrats to the left. Refute the claims of compassion and conservation of the "compassionate conservatives."

In his address on November 4th President Bush said, "I earned capital in this election and I am going to spend it." It sent chills down our spines. What does that mean? A mandate to bomb Fallujah, to bring more troops into Iraq, to apply the "Iraq" model to proliferation in Iran and North Korea, to roll civil rights back even further in the U.S.? And worse?In his address on November 4th President Bush said, "I earned capital in this election and I am going to spend it." It sent chills down our spines. What does that mean? A mandate to bomb Fallujah, to bring more troops into Iraq, to apply the "Iraq" model to proliferation in Iran and North Korea, to roll civil rights back even further in the U.S.? And worse?

In his address on November 4th President Bush said, "I earned capital in this election and I am going to spend it." It sent chills down our spines. What does that mean? A mandate to bomb Fallujah, to bring more troops into Iraq, to apply the "Iraq" model to proliferation in Iran and North Korea, to roll civil rights back even further in the U.S.? And worse?

On foreign policy, some of the more extreme elements of the neo-conservative agenda may be reined in by the reality of the fiasco they have created in Iraq, which is draining blood and treasure at an accelerating rate with no clear end in sight (barring a radical reconsideration of the goals of U.S. policy). This may provide some leverage to press for good faith negotiations in North Korea and Iran, although much may depend on who is appointed Secretary of State, and whether neo-cons are eased out of key mid-level positions at the Pentagon and in the White House in favor of more pragmatic advisors.On foreign policy, some of the more extreme elements of the neo-conservative agenda may be reined in by the reality of the fiasco they have created in Iraq, which is draining blood and treasure at an accelerating rate with no clear end in sight (barring a radical reconsideration of the goals of U.S. policy). This may provide some leverage to press for good faith negotiations in North Korea and Iran, although much may depend on who is appointed Secretary of State, and whether neo-cons are eased out of key mid-level positions at the Pentagon and in the White House in favor of more pragmatic advisors.

On foreign policy, some of the more extreme elements of the neo-conservative agenda may be reined in by the reality of the fiasco they have created in Iraq, which is draining blood and treasure at an accelerating rate with no clear end in sight (barring a radical reconsideration of the goals of U.S. policy). This may provide some leverage to press for good faith negotiations in North Korea and Iran, although much may depend on who is appointed Secretary of State, and whether neo-cons are eased out of key mid-level positions at the Pentagon and in the White House in favor of more pragmatic advisors.

Star Wars and a new generation of low-yield and bunker busting nuclear weapons will still be on the administration's agenda, and the challenge will be to educate a broader segment of the public (and at least some Congressional Republicans) about the risks and costs of proceeding with these ill-conceived programs. Efforts to block the worst features of the Bush foreign policy agenda while pressing for positive movement on a few key issues will be greatly enhanced if there is movement on broader political reform happening in parallel to these efforts.Star Wars and a new generation of low-yield and bunker busting nuclear weapons will still be on the administration's agenda, and the challenge will be to educate a broader segment of the public (and at least some Congressional Republicans) about the risks and costs of proceeding with these ill-conceived programs. Efforts to block the worst features of the Bush foreign policy agenda while pressing for positive movement on a few key issues will be greatly enhanced if there is movement on broader political reform happening in parallel to these efforts.

Star Wars and a new generation of low-yield and bunker busting nuclear weapons will still be on the administration's agenda, and the challenge will be to educate a broader segment of the public (and at least some Congressional Republicans) about the risks and costs of proceeding with these ill-conceived programs. Efforts to block the worst features of the Bush foreign policy agenda while pressing for positive movement on a few key issues will be greatly enhanced if there is movement on broader political reform happening in parallel to these efforts.

In his TalkingPointsMemo.comTalkingPointsMemo.com, Joshua Micah Marshall reminds us that while Bush claims that his win represents a broad affirmation of his policies and gives him a mandate, in reality 51% of the popular vote is a skin of the teeth win. It is the narrowest victory by an incumbent president since Woodrow Wilson's re-election in 1916.In his TalkingPointsMemo.com, Joshua Micah Marshall reminds us that while Bush claims that his win represents a broad affirmation of his policies and gives him a mandate, in reality 51% of the popular vote is a skin of the teeth win. It is the narrowest victory by an incumbent president since Woodrow Wilson's re-election in 1916.

In his TalkingPointsMemo.com, Joshua Micah Marshall reminds us that while Bush claims that his win represents a broad affirmation of his policies and gives him a mandate, in reality 51% of the popular vote is a skin of the teeth win. It is the narrowest victory by an incumbent president since Woodrow Wilson's re-election in 1916.

He says:
"This isn't 1964 or 1972 or 1980. This wasn't a blowout or a repudiation. It was close to a tie -- unfortunately, on the other guy's side. Let's not put our heads in the sand but let's also not get knocked off our game. Democrats need to think critically and seriously about why this didn't turn out 51% for Kerry or 55% for Kerry (and we'll get to those points in the future).
He says: "This isn't 1964 or 1972 or 1980. This wasn't a blowout or a repudiation. It was close to a tie -- unfortunately, on the other guy's side. Let's not put our heads in the sand but let's also not get knocked off our game. Democrats need to think critically and seriously about why this didn't turn out 51% for Kerry or 55% for Kerry (and we'll get to those points in the future).

He says: "This isn't 1964 or 1972 or 1980. This wasn't a blowout or a repudiation. It was close to a tie -- unfortunately, on the other guy's side. Let's not put our heads in the sand but let's also not get knocked off our game. Democrats need to think critically and seriously about why this didn't turn out 51% for Kerry or 55% for Kerry (and we'll get to those points in the future).

"Take time to feel the desolation and disappointment. But I remain confident that time is not on the side of the kind of values and politics that President Bush represents. It took conservatives two decades to build up the institutional muscle they have today*. President Bush and the Republicans now control the entire national government, even more surely now than they have over the last four years. They do so on the basis of garnering the votes of 51% or 52% of the population. But they will use that power as though there were no opposition at all. That needs to be countered.""Take time to feel the desolation and disappointment. But I remain confident that time is not on the side of the kind of values and politics that President Bush represents. It took conservatives two decades to build up the institutional muscle they have today*. President Bush and the Republicans now control the entire national government, even more surely now than they have over the last four years. They do so on the basis of garnering the votes of 51% or 52% of the population. But they will use that power as though there were no opposition at all. That needs to be countered."

"Take time to feel the desolation and disappointment. But I remain confident that time is not on the side of the kind of values and politics that President Bush represents. It took conservatives two decades to build up the institutional muscle they have today*. President Bush and the Republicans now control the entire national government, even more surely now than they have over the last four years. They do so on the basis of garnering the votes of 51% or 52% of the population. But they will use that power as though there were no opposition at all. That needs to be countered."

Marshall recalls a conversation with Simon Rosenberg, the head of New Democrat Network, whose mission is to modernize progressive politics, build a new and durable Democratic majority, and advocate for an agenda that will create a better future for our children.Marshall recalls a conversation with Simon Rosenberg, the head of New Democrat Network, whose mission is to modernize progressive politics, build a new and durable Democratic majority, and advocate for an agenda that will create a better future for our children.

Marshall recalls a conversation with Simon Rosenberg, the head of New Democrat Network, whose mission is to modernize progressive politics, build a new and durable Democratic majority, and advocate for an agenda that will create a better future for our children.

Rosenberg is taking a long view, acknowledging that the Democrats are far behind the Republicans in institution building that supports political thought, strategy and action.Rosenberg is taking a long view, acknowledging that the Democrats are far behind the Republicans in institution building that supports political thought, strategy and action.

Rosenberg is taking a long view, acknowledging that the Democrats are far behind the Republicans in institution building that supports political thought, strategy and action.

NDN seeks to fill that gap. Marshall notes that there is a need for institutions and organizational infrastructure that can sustain energy and power when people's interest cools or dissipates - especially after a disappointment like Kerry's loss.NDN seeks to fill that gap. Marshall notes that there is a need for institutions and organizational infrastructure that can sustain energy and power when people's interest cools or dissipates - especially after a disappointment like Kerry's loss.

NDN seeks to fill that gap. Marshall notes that there is a need for institutions and organizational infrastructure that can sustain energy and power when people's interest cools or dissipates - especially after a disappointment like Kerry's loss.

"What Democrats have begun to build over the last two years is tremendously important. It just wasn't enough, not yet." Simon Rosenberg says that efforts to create a Democratic-leaning counter-establishment along the lines of what Republicans did two generations ago -- with an alternative media, activist groups, organized political giving, in short, a political infrastructure -- will take ten years to build."What Democrats have begun to build over the last two years is tremendously important. It just wasn't enough, not yet." Simon Rosenberg says that efforts to create a Democratic-leaning counter-establishment along the lines of what Republicans did two generations ago -- with an alternative media, activist groups, organized political giving, in short, a political infrastructure -- will take ten years to build.

"What Democrats have begun to build over the last two years is tremendously important. It just wasn't enough, not yet." Simon Rosenberg says that efforts to create a Democratic-leaning counter-establishment along the lines of what Republicans did two generations ago -- with an alternative media, activist groups, organized political giving, in short, a political infrastructure -- will take ten years to build.

Marshall encourages us to keep doing that work, saying, "Leave today for disappointment. Tomorrow, think over which of these various groups and organizations you think has made the best start toward what I've described above, go to their website, and give money or volunteer*. You shouldn't lose heart. The same division in the country remains, the same stalemate. The other side just got the ball a yard or two into our side of the field rather than the reverse. And we have to deal with the serious consequences of that. Tomorrow's the day to start."Marshall encourages us to keep doing that work, saying, "Leave today for disappointment. Tomorrow, think over which of these various groups and organizations you think has made the best start toward what I've described above, go to their website, and give money or volunteer*. You shouldn't lose heart. The same division in the country remains, the same stalemate. The other side just got the ball a yard or two into our side of the field rather than the reverse. And we have to deal with the serious consequences of that. Tomorrow's the day to start."

Marshall encourages us to keep doing that work, saying, "Leave today for disappointment. Tomorrow, think over which of these various groups and organizations you think has made the best start toward what I've described above, go to their website, and give money or volunteer*. You shouldn't lose heart. The same division in the country remains, the same stalemate. The other side just got the ball a yard or two into our side of the field rather than the reverse. And we have to deal with the serious consequences of that. Tomorrow's the day to start."

Read his whole message on his site: www.talkingpointsmemo.comwww.talkingpointsmemo.comRead his whole message on his site: www.talkingpointsmemo.com

Read his whole message on his site: www.talkingpointsmemo.com

Matt Bai wrote a long article for the New York Times magazine in July 2004 called "Wiring the Vast Left Wing Conspiracy""Wiring the Vast Left Wing Conspiracy" about who is doing that work and how.... It is worth a read.Matt Bai wrote a long article for the New York Times magazine in July 2004 called "Wiring the Vast Left Wing Conspiracy" about who is doing that work and how.... It is worth a read.

Matt Bai wrote a long article for the New York Times magazine in July 2004 called "Wiring the Vast Left Wing Conspiracy" about who is doing that work and how.... It is worth a read.

II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS?II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS?II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS?
II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS?
II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS?

II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS?
If you have doubts about the conduct of this election, there is plenty of evidence to confirm your suspicions:
II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS? If you have doubts about the conduct of this election, there is plenty of evidence to confirm your suspicions:

II. ELECTORAL MALFUNCTIONS? If you have doubts about the conduct of this election, there is plenty of evidence to confirm your suspicions:

-- The most credible that we have encountered comes from Greg Palast, a tireless investigative reporter, who knows the issue inside and out. His latest take on the election can be found on TomPaine.com. Palast notes, Bush won Ohio by 136,483 votes. In the US, about 3% of votes case are voided -- known as "spoilage" in election jargon -- because the ballots cast are inconclusive. Drawing on what happened in Florida and studies of elections past, Greg Palast argues that if Ohio's discarded ballots were counted, Kerry would have won the state. Today, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports there are a total of 247,672 votes not counted in Ohio, if you add the 92,672 discarded votes plus the 155,000 provisional ballots. Read his article "Kerry Won...""Kerry Won...", and "An Election Spoiled Rotten""An Election Spoiled Rotten"-- The most credible that we have encountered comes from Greg Palast, a tireless investigative reporter, who knows the issue inside and out. His latest take on the election can be found on TomPaine.com. Palast notes, Bush won Ohio by 136,483 votes. In the US, about 3% of votes case are voided -- known as "spoilage" in election jargon -- because the ballots cast are inconclusive. Drawing on what happened in Florida and studies of elections past, Greg Palast argues that if Ohio's discarded ballots were counted, Kerry would have won the state. Today, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports there are a total of 247,672 votes not counted in Ohio, if you add the 92,672 discarded votes plus the 155,000 provisional ballots. Read his article "Kerry Won...", and "An Election Spoiled Rotten"

-- The most credible that we have encountered comes from Greg Palast, a tireless investigative reporter, who knows the issue inside and out. His latest take on the election can be found on TomPaine.com. Palast notes, Bush won Ohio by 136,483 votes. In the US, about 3% of votes case are voided -- known as "spoilage" in election jargon -- because the ballots cast are inconclusive. Drawing on what happened in Florida and studies of elections past, Greg Palast argues that if Ohio's discarded ballots were counted, Kerry would have won the state. Today, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports there are a total of 247,672 votes not counted in Ohio, if you add the 92,672 discarded votes plus the 155,000 provisional ballots. Read his article "Kerry Won...", and "An Election Spoiled Rotten"

-- Buried in the technology section on CNN.com is an AP article "E-vote goes smoothly, but experts skeptical: No paper trail means software glitches, tampering may go unnoticed,""E-vote goes smoothly, but experts skeptical: No paper trail means software glitches, tampering may go unnoticed,"-- Buried in the technology section on CNN.com is an AP article "E-vote goes smoothly, but experts skeptical: No paper trail means software glitches, tampering may go unnoticed,"

-- Buried in the technology section on CNN.com is an AP article "E-vote goes smoothly, but experts skeptical: No paper trail means software glitches, tampering may go unnoticed,"

-- "According to e-voting haters and some bloggers, the fact that the election went smoothly is no comfort-- the whole problem with electronic voting is that someone could swoop in and changed the votes without anyone having a clue," For a full run down of recent articles on e-voting go to "Rage Against the Machines: The Web wonders if electronic voting machines stole the election,""Rage Against the Machines: The Web wonders if electronic voting machines stole the election," by Josh Levin-- "According to e-voting haters and some bloggers, the fact that the election went smoothly is no comfort-- the whole problem with electronic voting is that someone could swoop in and changed the votes without anyone having a clue," For a full run down of recent articles on e-voting go to "Rage Against the Machines: The Web wonders if electronic voting machines stole the election," by Josh Levin

-- "According to e-voting haters and some bloggers, the fact that the election went smoothly is no comfort-- the whole problem with electronic voting is that someone could swoop in and changed the votes without anyone having a clue," For a full run down of recent articles on e-voting go to "Rage Against the Machines: The Web wonders if electronic voting machines stole the election," by Josh Levin

-- Walden W. O'Dell, chief executive of Diebold Inc., the country's biggest supplier of paperless, touch-screen voting machines -- used in Ohio, Florida, New Mexico and others -- wrote a letter inviting friends to a Republican Party fundraiser, in the letter he wrote, "I am committed to helping Ohio deliver its electoral votes to the president next year." O'Dell's company is based in Ohio, while subsidiary Diebold Election Systems is located in McKinney, Texas. At least 8 million people cast their ballots using Diebold machines, hmmmm, maybe a slight conflict of interest? www.nytimes.comwww.nytimes.com-- Walden W. O'Dell, chief executive of Diebold Inc., the country's biggest supplier of paperless, touch-screen voting machines -- used in Ohio, Florida, New Mexico and others -- wrote a letter inviting friends to a Republican Party fundraiser, in the letter he wrote, "I am committed to helping Ohio deliver its electoral votes to the president next year." O'Dell's company is based in Ohio, while subsidiary Diebold Election Systems is located in McKinney, Texas. At least 8 million people cast their ballots using Diebold machines, hmmmm, maybe a slight conflict of interest? www.nytimes.com

-- Walden W. O'Dell, chief executive of Diebold Inc., the country's biggest supplier of paperless, touch-screen voting machines -- used in Ohio, Florida, New Mexico and others -- wrote a letter inviting friends to a Republican Party fundraiser, in the letter he wrote, "I am committed to helping Ohio deliver its electoral votes to the president next year." O'Dell's company is based in Ohio, while subsidiary Diebold Election Systems is located in McKinney, Texas. At least 8 million people cast their ballots using Diebold machines, hmmmm, maybe a slight conflict of interest? www.nytimes.com

-- A November 3rd Reuters article reported, "Voters across the US reported problems with the electronic touch-screen systems on Tuesday in what critics said could be a sign that the machines used by one-third of the population were prone to error." The article goes on to note that voters calling into an election-day hotline reported more than 1,100 problems with the machines -- from improperly tallied choices to frozen screens to candidates not even listed on the ballots. Read the article at www.commondreams.orgwww.commondreams.org-- A November 3rd Reuters article reported, "Voters across the US reported problems with the electronic touch-screen systems on Tuesday in what critics said could be a sign that the machines used by one-third of the population were prone to error." The article goes on to note that voters calling into an election-day hotline reported more than 1,100 problems with the machines -- from improperly tallied choices to frozen screens to candidates not even listed on the ballots. Read the article at www.commondreams.org

-- A November 3rd Reuters article reported, "Voters across the US reported problems with the electronic touch-screen systems on Tuesday in what critics said could be a sign that the machines used by one-third of the population were prone to error." The article goes on to note that voters calling into an election-day hotline reported more than 1,100 problems with the machines -- from improperly tallied choices to frozen screens to candidates not even listed on the ballots. Read the article at www.commondreams.org

Additional Resources:
1. Institute for Public Accuracy, Was the Ohio Election Honest and Fair?Institute for Public Accuracy, Was the Ohio Election Honest and Fair?
Additional Resources: 1. Institute for Public Accuracy, Was the Ohio Election Honest and Fair?

Additional Resources: 1. Institute for Public Accuracy, Was the Ohio Election Honest and Fair?

2. For a comprehensive, non-partisan background on the perils and benefits of e-voting, check out WIRED NewsWIRED News E-voting gains a foothold at polling places in the U.S. and abroad, despite fears that the technology is flawed and votes easily manipulated. Is the voting booth still sacred? Does your vote still count?2. For a comprehensive, non-partisan background on the perils and benefits of e-voting, check out WIRED News E-voting gains a foothold at polling places in the U.S. and abroad, despite fears that the technology is flawed and votes easily manipulated. Is the voting booth still sacred? Does your vote still count?

2. For a comprehensive, non-partisan background on the perils and benefits of e-voting, check out WIRED News E-voting gains a foothold at polling places in the U.S. and abroad, despite fears that the technology is flawed and votes easily manipulated. Is the voting booth still sacred? Does your vote still count?

3. For background articles on voting machines take a look at "Voting Machine Controversy,""Voting Machine Controversy," by Julie Carr Smyth, and "Diebold's Political Machine,""Diebold's Political Machine," by Bob Fitrakis and Harvey Wasserman, which appeared in Mother Jones3. For background articles on voting machines take a look at "Voting Machine Controversy," by Julie Carr Smyth, and "Diebold's Political Machine," by Bob Fitrakis and Harvey Wasserman, which appeared in Mother Jones

3. For background articles on voting machines take a look at "Voting Machine Controversy," by Julie Carr Smyth, and "Diebold's Political Machine," by Bob Fitrakis and Harvey Wasserman, which appeared in Mother Jones

4. **EXIT POLL PROBLEMS LED TO SKEWED DATA
The new $10 million polling system used by many news organizations was marred by problems that led to an early impression that John Kerry was winning. WSJ: "To the extent that blogs provide people with bad or misleading information, I hope that teaches people not to trust media in general,"WSJ: "To the extent that blogs provide people with bad or misleading information, I hope that teaches people not to trust media in general," says Wonkette editor Ana Marie Cox. Mediachannel: Moral values' factor skewed by faulty exit polling,Mediachannel: Moral values' factor skewed by faulty exit polling, writes Andrew Tyndall.
4. **EXIT POLL PROBLEMS LED TO SKEWED DATA The new $10 million polling system used by many news organizations was marred by problems that led to an early impression that John Kerry was winning. WSJ: "To the extent that blogs provide people with bad or misleading information, I hope that teaches people not to trust media in general," says Wonkette editor Ana Marie Cox. Mediachannel: Moral values' factor skewed by faulty exit polling, writes Andrew Tyndall.

4. **EXIT POLL PROBLEMS LED TO SKEWED DATA The new $10 million polling system used by many news organizations was marred by problems that led to an early impression that John Kerry was winning. WSJ: "To the extent that blogs provide people with bad or misleading information, I hope that teaches people not to trust media in general," says Wonkette editor Ana Marie Cox. Mediachannel: Moral values' factor skewed by faulty exit polling, writes Andrew Tyndall.

III. NO WIN ON THE CHEAPIII. NO WIN ON THE CHEAPIII. NO WIN ON THE CHEAP
III. NO WIN ON THE CHEAP
III. NO WIN ON THE CHEAP

The Center for Responsive Politics calls this election the most expensive in American history, with candidates spending more than $4 billion.The Center for Responsive Politics calls this election the most expensive in American history, with candidates spending more than $4 billion.

The Center for Responsive Politics calls this election the most expensive in American history, with candidates spending more than $4 billion.

Their recent press release "Money Wins Big" finds that the biggest spender was victorious in 413 of 433 decided House races (96%) and 29 of 33 decided Senate races (91%). This is an even greater proportion than on Election Day 2002,when the top spenders won 95 percent of House races and 76 percent of Senate races.Their recent press release "Money Wins Big" finds that the biggest spender was victorious in 413 of 433 decided House races (96%) and 29 of 33 decided Senate races (91%). This is an even greater proportion than on Election Day 2002,when the top spenders won 95 percent of House races and 76 percent of Senate races.

Their recent press release "Money Wins Big" finds that the biggest spender was victorious in 413 of 433 decided House races (96%) and 29 of 33 decided Senate races (91%). This is an even greater proportion than on Election Day 2002,when the top spenders won 95 percent of House races and 76 percent of Senate races.

"In the race for the White House, President Bush spent a total of $306.3 million in private and government funds from January 2003. Sen. John Kerry, who faced a tough battle for the Democratic nomination, spent $241.7 million. These figures do not include spending by the political parties or advocacy groups on the presidential election."In the race for the White House, President Bush spent a total of $306.3 million in private and government funds from January 2003. Sen. John Kerry, who faced a tough battle for the Democratic nomination, spent $241.7 million. These figures do not include spending by the political parties or advocacy groups on the presidential election.

"In the race for the White House, President Bush spent a total of $306.3 million in private and government funds from January 2003. Sen. John Kerry, who faced a tough battle for the Democratic nomination, spent $241.7 million. These figures do not include spending by the political parties or advocacy groups on the presidential election.

For all the details, visit www.OpenSecrets.orgwww.OpenSecrets.orgFor all the details, visit www.OpenSecrets.org

For all the details, visit www.OpenSecrets.org

IV. DEMOCRACY ON THE MARCH?IV. DEMOCRACY ON THE MARCH?IV. DEMOCRACY ON THE MARCH?
IV. DEMOCRACY ON THE MARCH?
IV. DEMOCRACY ON THE MARCH?

About 120 million Americans voted on Tuesday- pressing touch-screens, pulling levers, and filling out paper ballots with pens. All in all, about 60% of eligible voters made their choices, making this the most complete election since 1968.About 120 million Americans voted on Tuesday- pressing touch-screens, pulling levers, and filling out paper ballots with pens. All in all, about 60% of eligible voters made their choices, making this the most complete election since 1968.

About 120 million Americans voted on Tuesday- pressing touch-screens, pulling levers, and filling out paper ballots with pens. All in all, about 60% of eligible voters made their choices, making this the most complete election since 1968.

Much has been made of the turn out and the long lines at polling places.Much has been made of the turn out and the long lines at polling places.

Much has been made of the turn out and the long lines at polling places.

Miles Rapoport, President of Demos: A Network for Ideas & Action, a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy organization, says this is hugely important but indicative of a problem that most mainstream media misses.Miles Rapoport, President of Demos: A Network for Ideas & Action, a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy organization, says this is hugely important but indicative of a problem that most mainstream media misses.

Miles Rapoport, President of Demos: A Network for Ideas & Action, a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy organization, says this is hugely important but indicative of a problem that most mainstream media misses.

"This strong voter turnout occurred in many ways in spite of our elections system, not because of it*. "In applauding long voting lines as a triumph of democracy, commentators overlook a fundamental question: why can't we get our election systems right? We expected a record turnout and a surge of new voters, yet many still had to wait hours to cast their votes."This strong voter turnout occurred in many ways in spite of our elections system, not because of it*. "In applauding long voting lines as a triumph of democracy, commentators overlook a fundamental question: why can't we get our election systems right? We expected a record turnout and a surge of new voters, yet many still had to wait hours to cast their votes.

"This strong voter turnout occurred in many ways in spite of our elections system, not because of it*. "In applauding long voting lines as a triumph of democracy, commentators overlook a fundamental question: why can't we get our election systems right? We expected a record turnout and a surge of new voters, yet many still had to wait hours to cast their votes.

In short, Rapoport notes, "our electoral process suffered systemic and entirely preventable failures, including:In short, Rapoport notes, "our electoral process suffered systemic and entirely preventable failures, including:

In short, Rapoport notes, "our electoral process suffered systemic and entirely preventable failures, including:

-- Polling places opening late
-- Absentee ballots not being received by voters
-- Shortages of provisional ballots
-- Poll workers asking for ID that was not required
-- Registered voters names not appearing on voter registration rolls
-- Voting machine failures
-- Confusion over polling site changes
-- Understaffed polling stations, leading to long lines
-- Polling places opening late -- Absentee ballots not being received by voters -- Shortages of provisional ballots -- Poll workers asking for ID that was not required -- Registered voters names not appearing on voter registration rolls -- Voting machine failures -- Confusion over polling site changes -- Understaffed polling stations, leading to long lines

-- Polling places opening late -- Absentee ballots not being received by voters -- Shortages of provisional ballots -- Poll workers asking for ID that was not required -- Registered voters names not appearing on voter registration rolls -- Voting machine failures -- Confusion over polling site changes -- Understaffed polling stations, leading to long lines

"Most of the problems that arose during yesterday's election were preventable, and highlight the need for substantial reform before our next Presidential election.""Most of the problems that arose during yesterday's election were preventable, and highlight the need for substantial reform before our next Presidential election."

"Most of the problems that arose during yesterday's election were preventable, and highlight the need for substantial reform before our next Presidential election."

For information about Demos, and their program on voters' rights, visit their homepage at www.demos-usa.orgwww.demos-usa.orgFor information about Demos, and their program on voters' rights, visit their homepage at www.demos-usa.org

For information about Demos, and their program on voters' rights, visit their homepage at www.demos-usa.org

V. NATIONAL IQ'S AND THE ELECTIONV. NATIONAL IQ'S AND THE ELECTIONV. NATIONAL IQ'S AND THE ELECTION
V. NATIONAL IQ'S AND THE ELECTION
V. NATIONAL IQ'S AND THE ELECTION

And... in addition to our cries, we still need to laugh, check out these sobering statistics: National IQ's and the ElectionNational IQ's and the ElectionAnd... in addition to our cries, we still need to laugh, check out these sobering statistics: National IQ's and the Election

And... in addition to our cries, we still need to laugh, check out these sobering statistics: National IQ's and the Election

ReportsReports   |  Recent News CoverageRecent News Coverage   |  UpdatesUpdatesReports   |  Recent News Coverage   |  UpdatesReports   |  Recent News Coverage   |  Updates

Reports   |  Recent News Coverage   |  Updates

Share/Save
FALL FUNDRAISER

 

Around WPI

Jihad in Sub-Saharan Africa 

This paper, “Jihad in Sub-Saharan Africa: Challenging the Narratives of the War on Terror,” examines the history of Islamic movements in Africa's Sahel region to contextualize current conflicts.

World Economic Roundtable with Vicente Fox 

In this World Economic Roundtable, former Mexican President Vicente Fox discusses his current quest to make his country a hub for technology. 

Intern at World Policy


Want to join our team? Looking for an experience at one of the most highly sought-after internships for ambitious students? Application details here.

 

Al Gore presides over Arctic Roundtable 

As the United States prepares to assume chairmanship of the Arctic Council in 2015, this inaugural convening of the Arctic Deeply Roundtables launches a vital conversation for our times. 

SPONSORED

When the Senate Worked for Us:
New book offers untold stories of how activist staffers countered corporate lobbies in the U.S.


MA in International Policy and Development
Middlebury Institute (Monterey, CA): Put theory into practice through client-based coursework. Apply by Nov. 30.


Millennium Project’s State of the Future 19.0: Collective Intelligence on the Future of the World

WEEKLY NEWSLETTER

To learn about the latest in media, programming, and fellowship, subscribe to the World Policy Weekly Newsletter and read through our archives.

World Policy on Facebook

FOLLOW US